Learn Thai Speaking

If you want to master conversational Thai with minimal efforts, you are at the right place! Learn Thai in Singapore offers basic Thai conversation lessons for beginners in which you will learn how to use Thai to express everyday small talk. Lesson topics include, but is not limited to:

  • Introduction & Greetings: e.g. Name, Occupation
  • Hobbies & Interests: Sharing what you like / dislike
  • Thai Numbers
  • Getting around in Thailand
  • Expressing your emotions

The above are some of the topics you should be familiar with by the 3rd month. As this beginner Thai speaking lesson is 1-1, it can be further tailored to your Thai language proficiency standards, interests and needs.

Please contact me for 1-1 Thai speaking lessons starting today! 🥰

Sample Thai Speaking lessons via text messages

sample text message - learn Thai in Singapore
sample text message - learn Thai in Singapore
sample text message - learn Thai in Singapore

How to learn Thai Speaking for Beginners

There is nothing more useful than a pocket of handy phrases for you to start off conversing in Thai! Thai is a very fluid language with bare minimum grammar patterns so there’s no such thing as a “grammar book” for you to study. I really started picking up Thai speaking when I got thrown into the deep end – I went to Thailand for my student exchange programme after studying bare minimum Thai and was forced to converse in Thai daily – ranging from for simple things such as ordering food right up to complex issues such as setting my accommodation woes 😲 You can check out my learning Thai speaking journey under my About page. But this turned out to be a blessing in disguise as it helped me master basic Thai conversations quickly.

For beginner Thai learners, the best way to start off learning Thai speaking is to memorize the “Thai way” of expressing yourself and constantly practice your Thai conversation skills with someone who speaks Thai. If you do this for an entire week, it is likely you can master basic Thai conversations (such as introducing yourself) within 10 days! You can use the sample phrases below as your starting point.

Enjoy learning, rian hai sanook sanook na kha~

5 Basic Thai Greetings for Beginners

Please note:

  • Guys usually end their sentences with “khrap / krub” [different ways to pronounce ครับ]. For girls, polite sentences end off with “kha / ka” (ค่ะ, falling tone) and polite questions end off with kha (คะ, high tone).
    See blog post here on when to use khrap, kha and other ending particles.

  • “I” for guys is phom (ผม, rising tone). “I” for girls is more complicated – but most of the time you wouldn’t go wrong with chan (ฉัน, rising tone).
    Check out my blog post here on the many different ways to say “I” in Thai
  • For simplicity, all conversation below will be using female terms (i.e. “chan” for I, “ka”) for ending particle. For guys, please replace “chan” with “phom” and “ka” with “krap”.
  1. Hallo, what is your name? My name is [name]
    Sawatdii ka สวัสดี ค่ะ
    Khun chue arai ka? คุณชื่ออะไร คะ
    Chan chue [name] ka ฉัน ชื่อ [name] ค่ะ
  1. How are you? I’m fine, thank you.
    Khun sabaay dee mai ka? คุณสบายดีไหม คะ
    Chan sabaay dee ka. Khoop khun ka ฉัน สบายดี ค่ะ ขอบคุณ ค่ะ
  1. Nice to meet you
    Yin dee thii dai ru cak na ka ยินดีที่ได้รู้จักนะ คะ
  1. Welcome [to a place]
    Yin dee ton rap na ka ยินดีต้อนรับนะ ค่ะ

  2. I am [occupation]
    Chan pben [occupation] ka ฉัน เป็น [occupation] ค่ะ

Numbers in Thai

Fortunately, Thai numbers are fairly straightforward to memorize. Learning Thai numbers will be very useful for you to haggle for better prices, order dishes, or impress a pretty Thai girl when you take photos for her and start counting in Thai! 😘 The only thing to note is for written Thai, Thai numbers go by their own symbols where 1, 2, 3 [neung, song, saam] is written as ๑ , ๒ , ๓ and so on. But not to worry if all you need to know is how to pronounce the thai numbers.

Neung…song…saam…let’s dive in right now!

Thai Numbers 1 – 10

  1. ๑ – หนึ่ง – neung (one)
  2. ๒ – สอง – song (two)
  3. ๓ – สาม – saam (three)
  4. ๔ – สี่ – si (four)
  5. ๕ – ห้า – haa (five) — a side note, check out what does 55555 mean in Thai. You should have some idea now!
  6. ๖ – หก – hok (six)
  7. ๗ – เจ็ด – cet (seven)
  8. ๘ – แปด – pbet (eight)
  9. ๙ – เก้า – kao (nine)
  10. ๑๐ – สิบ – sip (ten)

Thai Numbers: Going Beyond 1 to 10

ร้อย – roy (hundred)
พัน – phan (thousand)
ล้าน – laan (million)

All that is left now is to pair up the numbers the way you do for Chinese (assuming you are a Chinese language speaker). For example, thirty 30 will be “saam sip” , forty five will be “si sip kao”. However, note some exceptions below:

  • 11, 31, 41 etc – สิบเอ็ด sip et (eleven), saam sip et (thirty one), si sip et (forty one)……and so on
  • 21, 22, 23 etc – ยี่สิบเอ็ด yii sip et (twenty one), yii sip song (twenty two), yii sip saam (twenty three)……and so on

Here’s a simple – no frills YouTube video I found to teach Thai 1 – 20.

9 Other Basic Thai Phrases for Beginners

Please note: For simplicity, all conversation below will be using female terms (i.e. “chan” for I, “ka”) for ending particle. For guys, please replace “chan” with “phom” and “ka” with “krap”.

1. I like / dislike [something]

Chan choop / mai choop [something] ka ฉัน ชอบ / ไม่ชอบ [something] ค่ะ

2. I want / do not want [verb]

Chan yaak / mai yaak [something] ka ฉัน อยาก / ไม่อยาก [something] ค่ะ

3. I want / do not want [noun]

Chan aw / mai aw [something] ka ฉัน เอา / ไม่เอา [something] ค่ะ

4. Where is [XX]

[XX] yuu thii nai ka [XX] อยู่ที่ไหน คะ

5. What is [XX]

[XX] kheu arai ka [XX] คืออะไร คะ

6. Yes / No

chai / mai chai ใช่ / ไม่ใช่

7. [XX] is expensive. Can you please lower the price?

[XX] pheng na lot noy dai mai ka [XX] แพงนะ ลดหน่อยได้ไหม คะ

8. You are very beautiful / handsome 😘

khun suay / lor maak คุณสวย / หล่อมาก 😘😘

9. I love you ❤️

chan / phom ruk khun ฉัน / ผม รักคุณ ❤️❤️

About the author – see the About page for more information

Joanne Tan is an aspiring polyglot and has so far mastered English, Chinese and Thai languages. She first started learning Thai in 2015 before staying in Bangkok for 5 months, and then continued studying Thai up to Advanced Levels at the National University of Singapore. In 2017, Joanne was awarded ‘Advanced Thai Proficiency’ by the Sirindhorn Thai Language Institute of Chulalongkorn University. Today, Joanne continues to teach her friends basic Thai speaking and helps her Thai friends actively promote Thai culture.